Category: Recruiting

Workplace Disloyalty: Doubles Down On Deception

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By Wayne R. Bodie, MBA, SPHR

Recently I spoke with a Director of Human Resources for a local Professional Employer Organization (PEO) during a networking event. She notified me that they were initiating a “Confidential” employment screening for a replacement Human Resources Manager and she asked if I knew anyone that may be interested. When I asked what happened to the incumbent, the response fell in-line with what is becoming the new standard. The Director stated the manager is currently still employed, but due to personality conflicts she may need to be “let go in a couple months.”

The hairs on the back of my neck stand when I hear comments such as these, so I asked three simple questions:

  1. Was the employee notified of a deficiency?
  2. Has the employee been placed on a plan for success?
  3. Did you attempt progressive discipline in attempts to correct behavior?

The answer to all three questions was a “no.”  So, this employer is sourcing for talent for a “what if” scenario that they are not interested in pre-emptively correcting. I personally see a moral and ethical breach on the part of the employer; however, things are always difficult to truly judge external to the organization. I bring this up because of employee and employer loyalty, both appear to be heading for extinction.

Recruiters will tell you 73% of people currently employed are open to exploring new employment possibilities. Conversely, if a recruiter contacts an organization having no current vacancies, may ask if they would like to “upgrade” any staff most will say yes. This employee and employer loyalty model has driven the median tenure rate to below 4.2 years according to the 2016 Department of Labor Statistics. The trend is expected to continue its downward spiral unless there is a drastic change in employment ideology.

If the employee and employer relationship is a problem, then certainly one of its associated symptoms is its effect on recruitment. Once a profession that once struck lifetime relationships, it was once possible to help the very same person through every transition of an employee’s career. For example, my grandfather worked for DuPont for 35 years until retirement. His two brothers had similar tenures with the same employer, and one of them worked his way from a blue-collar, non-exempt position to an executive. They all had living wages, promotions and enviable benefits by today’s standards.

This was yesteryear, recruiting is lucrative but it is also extremely competitive as a profession. Those that hustle make top dollar, and that’s generally only are placing 5% – 10% of inventory. Notice I used the word inventory instead of “Human Capital.” Top performers can’t be bothered with the 90% that is not hirable by organizations and they generate the most maintenance in terms of customer service. So, what do they do? Forget about the lost 90% and move on, no need for phone calls, feedback letters, or follow-ups.

Look at the horizon and wait until the internet giants awake from their slumber and begin capitalizing in the recruiting space. Imagine the disruption of the industry if Google, Facebook, and Microsoft go all in competing for market share. Don’t think they will try? Google is ramping up now. Imagine the power of Google AdSense’s targeted ads but think in terms of employment. Picture it, potential candidates surfing their favorite websites and instead of receiving a targeted ad they receive a targeted employment invitation. An open job, which they meet all qualifications, and need they only hit one click. Boutique recruitment firms would have to up their game to compete even in niche markets. I mean who could target better than google?

I can’t help but wonder if that increased level of technological innovation would help the employee-employer relationship or further exacerbate the problem. Would easier access to jobs and an expedited hiring process decrease average tenure due to increased availability? Or would it make finding the candidate’s dream job an easier reality thereby increasing our employee and employer loyalty relationship?  What do you think?

 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/tenure.pdf

Source: http://blog.accessperks.com/2017-employee-engagement-loyalty-statistics#1

Source: https://joshbersin.com/2017/05/google-for-jobs-disrupting-the-recruiting-market/

Source: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/07/17/google-hire-is-a-recruiting-tool-that-works-with-google-apps.html

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Lessons Learned from a Recruiter

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By Wayne R. Bodie, MBA, SPHR

A recruiter recently contacted me online. She texted that I had an interesting background then suggested we connect. I welcome new contacts and industry networking opportunities so I readily agreed to a video teleconference. That hour-long conversation morphed from the typical recruitment exchange into something different, a life lesson.

In a world now veiled with the most stringent political correctness, some topics are usually considered taboo during routine business conversations. Ours ventured off- grid to several off limits topics such as religion, spirituality, morals, ethics, and world travels. Although a departure, I found this recruiting approach refreshing from the more conventional “what region and salary range are you seeking”. This individual jockeyed into a “life coach” role rather than a recruiter.

After I expressed my delight about her happiness-consulting methodology to clients, she taught me a thing or two about life. I soon discovered this recruiter had completed a video conference two weeks prior with a candidate that had been devastated by life’s circumstance. “You visually could see the weight of the world on this candidate’s back. Her posture and presentation all but radiated defeat,” she said. “I took over an hour to slowly begin nursing back her confidence. All that the candidate needed was a little TLC and someone to believe in her.”

I could not believe what I was hearing, especially in this age. A sales professional who really cares about saving the world one person at a time. Amazing. A happy ending for the candidate for she is now in process of being placed with a firm due to this “life coach” tactic to recruiting. The candidate was so ecstatic about the personal attention she received that she sent a thank you letter to the agency referring to the recruiter as a “unicorn.” In my 17 years of handling recruiting, training, and onboarding, I have never received a thank you letter from a candidate calling me a unicorn. Most of the thank you letters I receive appear “canned” or plagiarized templates off Monster.com.

My take is this, just because you have done something for years, does not mean you have been doing it right. Or if you’re doing it right, be more open to being the finest professional your customer has on his or her team. This recruiter did nothing short of the same for me. After an hour of speaking with her, you know what I did? I went for a jog. Why? Because somehow during an interview, she convinced me that eating right and working out was important. Did you catch that? After an interview, the recruiter convinced me to take a jog. Now, that is some fine recruiting.

I had to strategically bring the interview to a close, because I was pretty sure if I had not, I would be joining the peace corps, traveling abroad then immersing myself in a third world country to tackle the most pressing challenges of our generation. We all need to be so effective on the job that our stakeholders will not only be satisfied with your service, that they will be delighted. To all recruiters out there that put this level of total quality service into your work, thank you. I will be borrowing from your tools and adding them to my own toolbox.

One person cannot save the world, but one person can save another’s world.  If we keep reciprocating this ideology to each other, it will lead to positive change.